Emory Classics
Information | Events | Faculty & Staff | Course Atlas | Publications | Links | Email
   

Barbara Melton

BARBARA LAWATSCH-MELTON

Office:
Candler Library

Phone:
404.727.7592

E-Mail:
blawats@emory.edu

EDUCATION

Ph.D. University of Salzburg, Austria, 1987.   History and Latin.
            Secondary Concentration: Classical Greek.

Diploma in American Studies, Fulbright Scholar. Smith College, 1982-84. 



EMPLOYMENT AND TEACHING EXPERIENCE:

Emory University, Department of Classics.  Fall 2002-present: Elementary Latin I and II; Intermediate Latin/Prose; Poetry (Catullus and Horace); The Classical Tradition and the American Founding (Seminar); Roman Satire (Seminar).

Emory University, Department of German Studies.  Summer 2005 (Emory-in-Vienna Program): Elementary German I and II.

Georgia Perimeter College.  Instructor, 2001-03
World Civilization from the Beginning to 1500 and from 1500 to the Present.

University of Minnesota, Department of German, Scandinavian, and Dutch.  Lecturer, 1997-98 Contemporary Austria (Austrian History of the 20th Century).

St. Mary’s College of Maryland, Division of Arts and Letters.  Adjunct Assistant Professor, 1987-94 Classical, Biblical, German, English, and American Literature; Elementary Latin I and II; Intermediate Latin; Roman Literature.

Private Instructor in German, Ithaca, New York and Guest Lecturer on Austrian
History, Literature, and Art, Ithaca College, 1983-84

 

PUBLICATIONS

Editor and Translator of Andrew White, S.J., Voyage to Maryland (1633).
Relatio Itineris in Marilandiam (first critical edition of Latin text, with extensive
introduction, notes, vocabulary, English translation, and facsimile of the 17th-century manuscript.)  Wauconda, IL: Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, 1995.

“Constructing Roman Senators in Imperial Germany.” Classical Receptions Journal 7, 1 (2015): 113-128.
Abstract: http://crj.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/clu018?ijkey=qRLbfX5MlXURWzu&keytype=ref

Appropriations of Cicero and Cato in the Making of American Civic Identity,” in Classics in the Modern World: A ‘ Democratic Turn’?  ed. L. Hardwick and S.J. Harrison (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013), 79-88.

“Amand Pachler’s Vita des heiligen Vitalis (1663) und die Wurzeln benediktinischer Geschichtsschreibung im Umfeld der Salzburger Universität,.” (“Amand Pachler’s Vita of Saint Vitalis (1663) and the Roots of Benedictine Historiogrpahy in the Orbit of the Salzburg University”) in Europäische Geschichtswelten (European Cultures of History), ed. Thomas Wallnig (Berlin, Munich: De Gruyter, 2012), 75-90.

“Loss and Gain in a Salzburg Convent: Tridentine Reform, Princely Absolutism, and the Nuns of Nonnberg (1620-1696),” in Enduring Loss in Early Modern Germany, ed. Lynne Tatlock (Leiden, Boston: Brill, 2010), 259-280.
http://www.brill.com/enduring-loss-early-modern-germany
Review:
http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/666039?origin=JSTOR-pdf

“Pendeln zwischen Ősterreich und den Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika,” in Kulturstereotype und Unbekannte Kulturlandschaften – am Beispiel von Amerika und Europa, eds. Joachim Brügge und Ulrike Kammerhofer-Aggermann (Salzburg: Mueller-Speiser, 2007).

“Die Seuffzende(n) Salzburger auf der Insel der Hoffnung: Die De Renne Library
und das frühe Schrifttum zur Salzburger.”  Mitteilungen der Gesellschaft für Salzburger Landeskunde 118 (1998). 

“Die Kunstbeschreibung als strukturierendes Stilmittel in den Panegyriken des Claudius Claudianus.”  Grazer Beiträge 18 (1992).

 
REVIEWS


Review of  Maria Wyke, Caesar in the USA, Journal of Roman Studies 104 (2014).

Regular Columnist, Austrian Studies Newsmagazine (formerly Austrian Studies Newsletter; articles, interviews, annually published reviews of the Salzburg Festival), 1996-present.


Selected Reviews:

“Salzburg Festival 2014: art and humanity amidst the horror of war” Austrian Studies Newsmagazine  (Center for Austrian Studies, University of Minnesota: Fall 2014)

“Salzburg Festival 2011: Is the festival finally responding to the world?”  Austrian Studies Newsletter  (Center for Austrian Studies, University of Minnesota: Fall 2011)

“Salzburg Festival 2010: A less outré clash between the gods and man?” Austrian Studies Newsletter Vol. 22, 2 (Center for Austrian Studies, University of Minnesota :Fall 2010)

“Salzburg Festival 09: ‘the game of the mighty’ – on and offstage,“ Austrian Studies Newsletter (Fall 2009).

Review of Paula Sutter Fichtner, From Dynasticism to Multinationalism.  A
History of the Habsburg Empire, Austrian History Yearbook 32 (2001).

 

IN PROGRESS

The liberal arts, the classical tradition, and the formation of civic values: exploring and teaching classical receptions in America

Classical figures in American newspapers (digital media project)

Creativity and enclosure among Benedictine nuns and monks in early modern Salzburg

Franziska von Meichl: musician, prioress, and author at the Convent of Nonnberg

 

SCHOLARLY PRESENTATIONS

“Essen, Trinken, Heilen, Schenken im nachtridentinischen Stift Nonnberg.” At conference Klosterküche, Institut für Gastrosophie der Universität Salzburg, Stift Melk, Austria, August 2015.

Constructing Roman Senators in Germany and British North America: A Comparative Approach.” At conference The Legacy of the Roman Senate, University of Glasgow, UK, September 2012.

“Monastic Life at the Convent of Nonnberg (1520-1699).” Emory University Woman’s Club, Atlanta, January 2011.

“The Purpose of Teaching Classical Receptions.”  Contribution to Classical Reception Studies Network e-seminar: “Classical Receptions: Teaching and Pedagogy,” convened by Joanna Paul (University of Liverpool, UK), 2010-11.

“Amand Pachler’s Vita des heiligen Vitalis (1663) und die Wurzeln benediktinischer Geschichtsschreibung im Umfeld der Salzburger Universität.” (“Amand Pachler’s Vita of Saint Vitalis (1663) and the Roots of Benedictine Historiography in the Orbit of the Salzburg University”) at conference Historia als Kultur. (Historia as Culture), University of Vienna, Austria, September 2010,

“Classical Receptions, Political Cultures, and Notions of Democracy.”  Panel organized at conference Classics in the Modern World – a Democratic Turn?, The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK, June 2010.

Appropriations of Cicero and Cato in Colonial America and the Early Republic.”   At conference Classics in the Modern World – a Democratic Turn?, see above,

“The Catonian Moment: 18th Century Classical Icons and the American ‘Millennial Generation’.” Classical Association of the Midwest and South, Oklahoma City, March 2010.

“The Debate and Its Terms,” lead contribution to e-seminarpreceding conference Classics in the Modern World – a Democratic Turn? An International Research Collaboration, convened by Lorna Hardwick (The Open University, UK) October 2009.

The Classical Tradition and Its Impact on the American Founding.”  Workshop for Teachers, Michael C. Carlos Museum, Emory University, June 2008.

“Loss and Gain in a Salzburg Convent: The Impact of Tridentine Reform and Princely Absolutism on the Nuns of Nonnberg (1620-1682).”  Conference sponsored by Frühe Neuzeit Interdisziplinär; Duke University, March, 2008; also at session of the European Studies Seminar, Emory University, December 2007.

“The Problem of Austrian Identity in the Interwar Period.”  Department of History, Emory University, 2000.

“Sixty Years of Austrian Cultural Influence in the United States.”  Center for Austrian Studies, University of Minnesota, 1997.

“Austrian Culture and Society after the Wars with the Ottoman Empire.”  Department of History, University of Sofia, 1996.

“Classical Rhetoric, Thomism and Aristotelian Thought in Andrew White’s Relatio Itineris in Marilandiam (1634).”  International Society for the Classical Tradition, Boston University, 1995).

“Die Praxis des wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens.”  Institut für Geschichte, Universität Innsbruck, 1994.

“A Seventeenth-Century View of the World in a Classical Idiom: Descriptions of the Lands and Native Peoples in Andrew White’s Relatio Itineris in Marilandiam.  American Philological Association, Atlanta, 1994; Ohio Classical Conference, Youngstown, 1992.

 “Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas.”  Early Music Festival, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, 1992.

“Perceptions of the East in Claudian’s Art Descriptions.”  Byzantine Studies Conference, Boston, 1991.

“I.F. Stone’s The Trial of Socrates.”  Faculty Seminar, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, 1988.

Interpreting Classical Texts: Plato’s Ion and Aristotle’s Poetics.”  Faculty Seminar, St. Mary’s College of Maryland 1988.

 

SERVICE

2012-13  Faculty Mentor of Yameka Meriweather, SIRE Program for Undergraduate Research; presentation selected as best project in the humanities.

Served on several Honors Thesis Committees:

2011-12  Honors thesis committee member for Kirsten Cooper, History Major.

2010-11  Honors thesis committee member for Paul Thomas Bright, Philosophy Major.
Thesis (Highest Honors): “Technique and Hyperreality: Promoting a “Better” Humanity”.

2009-10  Honors thesis committee member for Ashley Hanson, Joint Major in History and Classics.   Thesis (Highest Honors): “John Adams and Cicero: From Inspiration to Confidant”.  Ashley’s thesis originated in my course on “The Classical Tradition and the American Founding” (spring 2008).  Extensive consultation during the academic year

2006-07  Honors thesis committee member for Matthew Walker.

Adviser to Dominique Forrest (2008-2010)

Panel chair, “Reception Studies III”, Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Midwest and South, Oklahoma City, March 2010.

Participant in Great Works Series (2009-10) at the Center for Humanistic Inquiry, led by Garth Tissol (Department of Classics).  Topic: Thoreau’s Walden and the Republic of Letters.

Aided Maximilian Aue (Department of German Studies) in laying the groundwork for conference of MALCA (Modern Austrian Literature and Culture Association), held in April, 2009, at Emory: Budgetary estimates, arrangements at hotel and conference center, call for papers and publicity.  $ 25,000 subsidy obtained from Graduate School, Emory University. 

Served as panel moderator during the conference of MALCA, Emory University, April 2009 (see above).


PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

Associate Editor, Austrian History Yearbook, 2000-2003.

Research Fellow, Commission for Modern Austrian History, and Administrative
Liaison with the Center for Austrian Studies, University of Minnesota, 1994-99.

Reporter and Commentator for Austrian Public Radio (ORF), 1980.

HONORS

“Life after Smith”: Presentation as panel member at reunion celebrating 50th anniversary of the Diploma in American Studies Program at Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts, May 2012.
                                                                                                  
“Exploring Maryland’s Roots” (website supported by the U.S. Department of Education), recommends edition of Voyage to Maryland/Relatio Itineris in Marilandiam (see above)

Fulbright Scholar, 1982-84

 


   
Top | Home | Email